How to become a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional

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How to become a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional

Earlier this year I was recognized as a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP). This is an annual award which Microsoft gives to people who have demonstrated their expertise and passion about Microsoft technologies. Worldwide there are about 4,000 people in 90 countries who have been awarded, although in Peru there are currently just 9, and in Argentina just 19. In this blog post I want to talk about how you can also become an MVP and how it can help you in your careers.

Microsoft states the MVP award is for people who are “exceptional, independent community leaders who share their passion, technical expertise, and real-world knowledge of Microsoft products with others.” There are widespread benefits to becoming an MVP, beyond of course the recognition. As an MVP you have access to more Microsoft resources to help you stay at the forefront of new trends and technologies. You can contribute to discussions about new products before Microsoft releases them. There are also opportunities to network with other MVPs, both regionally and internationally – such as at the MVP Global Summit, where Microsoft provides details of new and upcoming products, or the Global Azure Bootcamp to share knowledge about Azure.

Interested in becoming an MVP?

If you also want to become an MVP, I recommend simply getting involved. For example, you can contribute in the form of writing blogs, providing advice on help-support forums, answering queries on Twitter, creating YouTube videos, or volunteering at conferences as a speaker.

For me, a key factor was my blog, which focuses on Visual Studio and Application Lifecycle Management. However you can focus your efforts on any Microsoft technology that you feel you are confident with, for example some people have had a blog for Excel, or Azure, or Windows Server, while I know another became an MVP just by contributing to Microsoft database forums. Then you can either apply yourself to the MVP program, or you can be nominated, for example by someone inside the local Microsoft community or by someone within Microsoft who has seen your contributions.

So my advice is simply to start getting active in discussion forums, or start your own blog on an area which you’re passionate about. Go to Microsoft events and meet other people interested in technology, volunteer, or give a talk yourself. Ultimately the process is about sharing your knowledge and expertise with others – so whether or not you become nominated, getting more involved with Microsoft technologies and improving your understanding should be your main goal.

Do you have any questions about becoming a Microsoft MVP? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

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